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Vaccines for Dogs

Vaccines for Dogs
Dogs
,
Preventive Care
Share this article
Vaccines for Dogs
Vaccines for Dogs
Dogs
,
Preventive Care
Vaccines for Dogs
Share this article
Vaccines for Dogs
Similar to human healthcare, vaccination has always been one of the most cost-efficient means of disease prevention and in improving animal health. Vaccines help to prevent infectious, debilitating, and life-threatening diseases in our pets, and contribute to public health by protecting us from some zoonotic diseases (diseases that spread between humans and animals).

Types of Vaccines

Vaccines can be split into two categories, core and non-core vaccines.

Core vaccines are defined as vaccines which all dogs, regardless of circumstance or geographical location, should receive. Core vaccines protect animals from severe, life-threatening diseases known to be present, including canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus (CAV) and canine parvovirus (CPV).

Non-core vaccines are used to protect dogs from diseases when factors such as geographical location, lifestyle, or environment, put them at risk. While all dogs should be vaccinated with core vaccines, non-core vaccines should be considered under specific circumstances. Your veterinarian will assess your pet’s risk factors and environment to customise a vaccination programme to suit their needs. This includes vaccines for leptospirosis, rabies, kennel cough (bordetella bronchiseptica (most common), parainfluenza virus, canine influenza virus, and others) and canine coronavirus.

Timing and Frequency of Vaccinations

Puppy vaccination series

The initial core vaccination should be given at 6 - 8 weeks of age. Subsequent boosters should be given every 2 - 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age or older.

First adult booster

The booster vaccine is routinely given at 52 weeks of age or within 1 year following the last dose of the puppy vaccination. This vaccine is crucial as it is protective for puppies that did not respond to any of the vaccines in the puppy vaccination schedule.

Subsequent vaccines for adult dogs

The Singapore Vaccination Guidelines for dogs has the following recommendations:

In Singapore, core vaccines are currently registered for annual booster intervals after the initial vaccinations. However, there has been increasing evidence that certain vaccine products may offer a longer duration of immunity. A veterinarian may recommend off-label booster intervals following an assessment of your pet and after discussing the pet’s lifestyle and risks with the client.

Alternatively, your veterinarian may suggest serological testing to assess the immunity (antibody titre) level of your pet to better advise if the booster intervals may be extended, while taking into consideration the pet’s lifestyle, environment, and discussing the risks with the owners.

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Similar to human healthcare, vaccination has always been one of the most cost-efficient means of disease prevention and in improving animal health. Vaccines help to prevent infectious, debilitating, and life-threatening diseases in our pets, and contribute to public health by protecting us from some zoonotic diseases (diseases that spread between humans and animals).

Types of Vaccines

Vaccines can be split into two categories, core and non-core vaccines.

Core vaccines are defined as vaccines which all dogs, regardless of circumstance or geographical location, should receive. Core vaccines protect animals from severe, life-threatening diseases known to be present, including canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus (CAV) and canine parvovirus (CPV).

Non-core vaccines are used to protect dogs from diseases when factors such as geographical location, lifestyle, or environment, put them at risk. While all dogs should be vaccinated with core vaccines, non-core vaccines should be considered under specific circumstances. Your veterinarian will assess your pet’s risk factors and environment to customise a vaccination programme to suit their needs. This includes vaccines for leptospirosis, rabies, kennel cough (bordetella bronchiseptica (most common), parainfluenza virus, canine influenza virus, and others) and canine coronavirus.

Timing and Frequency of Vaccinations

Puppy vaccination series

The initial core vaccination should be given at 6 - 8 weeks of age. Subsequent boosters should be given every 2 - 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age or older.

First adult booster

The booster vaccine is routinely given at 52 weeks of age or within 1 year following the last dose of the puppy vaccination. This vaccine is crucial as it is protective for puppies that did not respond to any of the vaccines in the puppy vaccination schedule.

Subsequent vaccines for adult dogs

The Singapore Vaccination Guidelines for dogs has the following recommendations:

In Singapore, core vaccines are currently registered for annual booster intervals after the initial vaccinations. However, there has been increasing evidence that certain vaccine products may offer a longer duration of immunity. A veterinarian may recommend off-label booster intervals following an assessment of your pet and after discussing the pet’s lifestyle and risks with the client.

Alternatively, your veterinarian may suggest serological testing to assess the immunity (antibody titre) level of your pet to better advise if the booster intervals may be extended, while taking into consideration the pet’s lifestyle, environment, and discussing the risks with the owners.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
Similar to human healthcare, vaccination has always been one of the most cost-efficient means of disease prevention and in improving animal health. Vaccines help to prevent infectious, debilitating, and life-threatening diseases in our pets, and contribute to public health by protecting us from some zoonotic diseases (diseases that spread between humans and animals).

Types of Vaccines

Vaccines can be split into two categories, core and non-core vaccines.

Core vaccines are defined as vaccines which all dogs, regardless of circumstance or geographical location, should receive. Core vaccines protect animals from severe, life-threatening diseases known to be present, including canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus (CAV) and canine parvovirus (CPV).

Non-core vaccines are used to protect dogs from diseases when factors such as geographical location, lifestyle, or environment, put them at risk. While all dogs should be vaccinated with core vaccines, non-core vaccines should be considered under specific circumstances. Your veterinarian will assess your pet’s risk factors and environment to customise a vaccination programme to suit their needs. This includes vaccines for leptospirosis, rabies, kennel cough (bordetella bronchiseptica (most common), parainfluenza virus, canine influenza virus, and others) and canine coronavirus.

Timing and Frequency of Vaccinations

Puppy vaccination series

The initial core vaccination should be given at 6 - 8 weeks of age. Subsequent boosters should be given every 2 - 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age or older.

First adult booster

The booster vaccine is routinely given at 52 weeks of age or within 1 year following the last dose of the puppy vaccination. This vaccine is crucial as it is protective for puppies that did not respond to any of the vaccines in the puppy vaccination schedule.

Subsequent vaccines for adult dogs

The Singapore Vaccination Guidelines for dogs has the following recommendations:

In Singapore, core vaccines are currently registered for annual booster intervals after the initial vaccinations. However, there has been increasing evidence that certain vaccine products may offer a longer duration of immunity. A veterinarian may recommend off-label booster intervals following an assessment of your pet and after discussing the pet’s lifestyle and risks with the client.

Alternatively, your veterinarian may suggest serological testing to assess the immunity (antibody titre) level of your pet to better advise if the booster intervals may be extended, while taking into consideration the pet’s lifestyle, environment, and discussing the risks with the owners.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
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