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Training Your Cat – It Can Be Done!

Training Your Cat – It Can Be Done!
Cats
,
Behaviour
Share this article
Training Your Cat – It Can Be Done!
Training Your Cat – It Can Be Done!
Cats
,
Behaviour
Training Your Cat – It Can Be Done!
Share this article
Training Your Cat – It Can Be Done!
Cats are notoriously strong-willed and independent pets, but our four-legged companions can be trained with time and patience. This can lead to an easier and more positive home life for you and your beloved pet.

Positive reinforcement should be the keystone of any feline training. This is fundamentally based on rewarding good behaviour through praise, affection, and/or treats. In general, cats do not have the same motivation to please us as dogs tend to, but they do like rewards!

General Trick and Skills Training

Teaching your cat tricks and skills can also be achieved with positive reinforcement. For example, you can teach your cat to sit and stay by saying “sit” when they sit down, and giving a treat reward so they associate the word “sit” with the action and reward of the treat. Teaching your cat to come when called is best done by using a chosen word such as “Here!” and offering a treat as you say the word so they learn to associate the command with the action.

Carrier Training

With training, our cats can learn to see their pet carrier as a safe, private space that they enjoy being in. Cats are naturally inquisitive animals who love to explore. Just think of how they are often more interested in the box their toys came in than the toy itself! Before introducing your cat to a pet carrier, ensure it is an appropriate size for your cat to sit comfortably in and turn around. Adding a comfortable blanket and a familiar toy can make the carrier feel more like home. Cat pheromone sprays, such as Feliway, can make the carrier a more relaxing space.

Start by feeding your cat near the pet carrier for several days, leaving the door of the carrier open to invite your cat to explore the space. Over several days, leave some of your cat’s favourite treats in the carrier. This will help them to associate the carrier with a positive experience. 

Gradually, you can work up to placing your cat in the carrier working up to several minutes over time. While your cat is in the carrier during this time, use positive reinforcement in the form of pets, a soft tone of voice, and treats. 

Once your cat is comfortable and relaxed with this, you can work up to closing the carrier door and providing plenty of reassurance and positive reinforcement. Do this just before your cat’s evening meal, and then let them out and feed them their dinner straight afterwards. These steps can be repeated for the first couple of weeks of training. Once your cat is comfortable with the door being shut on their carrier, you can begin to take them on short walks around the house, feeding them their dinner each time they are released from the carrier. Over time, you can build up to short journeys in the car, and before long, your cat will enjoy their carrier!

Toilet Training

Cats are generally very easy to litter box (tray) train as they will instinctively bury their faeces/urine after going to the toilet. To make the litter tray as appealing as possible, ensure that there is a layer of cat litter thick enough to cover the entire base of the tray. Cats are very clean animals, and many will not use a litter tray if it is dirty, so cleaning out the litter box after each toilet trip makes it more inviting for them to use. To help with this, you can keep multiple litter boxes in various locations throughout the house. 

Most cats will not use a litter box near their food and/or water, so keep them in separate places, or your cat will find their own toilet spot in your house! If you have several cats within the same house, the general rule is one litter tray per cat, plus one extra litter tray. Providing a cover (lid) over the litter box can also encourage your cat to use the litter box, as some cats prefer an extra level of privacy. 

When your cat uses the litter box, use positive reinforcement such as treats/praise so they associate it with a good experience. If your cat is having trouble with using their litter box it may be a sign that they are having a health issue, so it is recommended to contact your veterinarian for advice.

Summary

Training your cat can be rewarding and successful with time, patience, and the power of positive reinforcement.

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Cats are notoriously strong-willed and independent pets, but our four-legged companions can be trained with time and patience. This can lead to an easier and more positive home life for you and your beloved pet.

Positive reinforcement should be the keystone of any feline training. This is fundamentally based on rewarding good behaviour through praise, affection, and/or treats. In general, cats do not have the same motivation to please us as dogs tend to, but they do like rewards!

General Trick and Skills Training

Teaching your cat tricks and skills can also be achieved with positive reinforcement. For example, you can teach your cat to sit and stay by saying “sit” when they sit down, and giving a treat reward so they associate the word “sit” with the action and reward of the treat. Teaching your cat to come when called is best done by using a chosen word such as “Here!” and offering a treat as you say the word so they learn to associate the command with the action.

Carrier Training

With training, our cats can learn to see their pet carrier as a safe, private space that they enjoy being in. Cats are naturally inquisitive animals who love to explore. Just think of how they are often more interested in the box their toys came in than the toy itself! Before introducing your cat to a pet carrier, ensure it is an appropriate size for your cat to sit comfortably in and turn around. Adding a comfortable blanket and a familiar toy can make the carrier feel more like home. Cat pheromone sprays, such as Feliway, can make the carrier a more relaxing space.

Start by feeding your cat near the pet carrier for several days, leaving the door of the carrier open to invite your cat to explore the space. Over several days, leave some of your cat’s favourite treats in the carrier. This will help them to associate the carrier with a positive experience. 

Gradually, you can work up to placing your cat in the carrier working up to several minutes over time. While your cat is in the carrier during this time, use positive reinforcement in the form of pets, a soft tone of voice, and treats. 

Once your cat is comfortable and relaxed with this, you can work up to closing the carrier door and providing plenty of reassurance and positive reinforcement. Do this just before your cat’s evening meal, and then let them out and feed them their dinner straight afterwards. These steps can be repeated for the first couple of weeks of training. Once your cat is comfortable with the door being shut on their carrier, you can begin to take them on short walks around the house, feeding them their dinner each time they are released from the carrier. Over time, you can build up to short journeys in the car, and before long, your cat will enjoy their carrier!

Toilet Training

Cats are generally very easy to litter box (tray) train as they will instinctively bury their faeces/urine after going to the toilet. To make the litter tray as appealing as possible, ensure that there is a layer of cat litter thick enough to cover the entire base of the tray. Cats are very clean animals, and many will not use a litter tray if it is dirty, so cleaning out the litter box after each toilet trip makes it more inviting for them to use. To help with this, you can keep multiple litter boxes in various locations throughout the house. 

Most cats will not use a litter box near their food and/or water, so keep them in separate places, or your cat will find their own toilet spot in your house! If you have several cats within the same house, the general rule is one litter tray per cat, plus one extra litter tray. Providing a cover (lid) over the litter box can also encourage your cat to use the litter box, as some cats prefer an extra level of privacy. 

When your cat uses the litter box, use positive reinforcement such as treats/praise so they associate it with a good experience. If your cat is having trouble with using their litter box it may be a sign that they are having a health issue, so it is recommended to contact your veterinarian for advice.

Summary

Training your cat can be rewarding and successful with time, patience, and the power of positive reinforcement.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
Cats are notoriously strong-willed and independent pets, but our four-legged companions can be trained with time and patience. This can lead to an easier and more positive home life for you and your beloved pet.

Positive reinforcement should be the keystone of any feline training. This is fundamentally based on rewarding good behaviour through praise, affection, and/or treats. In general, cats do not have the same motivation to please us as dogs tend to, but they do like rewards!

General Trick and Skills Training

Teaching your cat tricks and skills can also be achieved with positive reinforcement. For example, you can teach your cat to sit and stay by saying “sit” when they sit down, and giving a treat reward so they associate the word “sit” with the action and reward of the treat. Teaching your cat to come when called is best done by using a chosen word such as “Here!” and offering a treat as you say the word so they learn to associate the command with the action.

Carrier Training

With training, our cats can learn to see their pet carrier as a safe, private space that they enjoy being in. Cats are naturally inquisitive animals who love to explore. Just think of how they are often more interested in the box their toys came in than the toy itself! Before introducing your cat to a pet carrier, ensure it is an appropriate size for your cat to sit comfortably in and turn around. Adding a comfortable blanket and a familiar toy can make the carrier feel more like home. Cat pheromone sprays, such as Feliway, can make the carrier a more relaxing space.

Start by feeding your cat near the pet carrier for several days, leaving the door of the carrier open to invite your cat to explore the space. Over several days, leave some of your cat’s favourite treats in the carrier. This will help them to associate the carrier with a positive experience. 

Gradually, you can work up to placing your cat in the carrier working up to several minutes over time. While your cat is in the carrier during this time, use positive reinforcement in the form of pets, a soft tone of voice, and treats. 

Once your cat is comfortable and relaxed with this, you can work up to closing the carrier door and providing plenty of reassurance and positive reinforcement. Do this just before your cat’s evening meal, and then let them out and feed them their dinner straight afterwards. These steps can be repeated for the first couple of weeks of training. Once your cat is comfortable with the door being shut on their carrier, you can begin to take them on short walks around the house, feeding them their dinner each time they are released from the carrier. Over time, you can build up to short journeys in the car, and before long, your cat will enjoy their carrier!

Toilet Training

Cats are generally very easy to litter box (tray) train as they will instinctively bury their faeces/urine after going to the toilet. To make the litter tray as appealing as possible, ensure that there is a layer of cat litter thick enough to cover the entire base of the tray. Cats are very clean animals, and many will not use a litter tray if it is dirty, so cleaning out the litter box after each toilet trip makes it more inviting for them to use. To help with this, you can keep multiple litter boxes in various locations throughout the house. 

Most cats will not use a litter box near their food and/or water, so keep them in separate places, or your cat will find their own toilet spot in your house! If you have several cats within the same house, the general rule is one litter tray per cat, plus one extra litter tray. Providing a cover (lid) over the litter box can also encourage your cat to use the litter box, as some cats prefer an extra level of privacy. 

When your cat uses the litter box, use positive reinforcement such as treats/praise so they associate it with a good experience. If your cat is having trouble with using their litter box it may be a sign that they are having a health issue, so it is recommended to contact your veterinarian for advice.

Summary

Training your cat can be rewarding and successful with time, patience, and the power of positive reinforcement.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
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Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
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