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Tick Fever in Dogs

Tick Fever in Dogs
Dogs
,
Health Conditions
Share this article
Tick Fever in Dogs
Tick Fever in Dogs
Dogs
,
Health Conditions
Tick Fever in Dogs
Share this article
Tick Fever in Dogs
Ticks are parasites that feed on the blood of host animals, including dogs. It is not uncommon to find ticks on our dogs, especially if they frequent public parks or dog runs. Ticks have the potential to spread diseases. Common tick-borne diseases in dogs include Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, and Babesiosis. These conditions are generally termed tick fever.

Signs of Tick Fever

  • Depending on the type and severity of the tick-borne disease, your dog may suffer from anaemia and/or thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet count). In severe cases, blood transfusion may be required.
  • Other symptoms include fever, lethargy, appetite loss, weight loss, diarrhoea, lameness, and nose bleed.
  • A small percentage of dogs develop ocular symptoms (e.g., conjunctivitis, uveitis, subconjunctival or retinal haemorrhage).
A Siberian Husky appears concerned while lying on the floor of a veterinary clinic with a water bowl and leash in the background.

How Can I Prevent Ticks on My Dog?

  • Perform a daily 'tick check', especially after an outing. Run your fingers through your dog’s fur to feel for small bumps. Check between toes and in the ear flaps.
  • Check your dogs before and after going to public places like dog runs, boarding, and grooming centres. We want to protect our dogs from ticks and also not to spread them.
  • Speak with your vet about shampoo, spot-ons, and oral preventives suitable for your dog.
Close-up view of a tick infestation on a dog's skin, highlighting the importance of parasite prevention and treatment.

I Found Ticks on My Dog. What Should I Do?

  • Remove ticks promptly to reduce the risk of disease transmission. Speak with your vet about the proper way of removing ticks.
  • Shave your dog’s fur to make tick detection easier.
  • Start tick prevention.
  • Consult your vet if your dog shows signs of infection.
  • Replace your dog’s used bedding.
  • Vacuum and wash linen regularly.
  • Engage a professional exterminator if your house is tick-infested.

Screening and Early Detection

As part of your dog’s health screen, we recommend a quick in-house blood test called SNAP 4Dx to detect tick-borne diseases. Treatment may include antibiotics and supportive medications depending on the type and severity of the tick-borne disease, as well as blood transfusion for dogs experiencing severe anaemia or bleeding disorders.

Schedule an appointment with our vets to discuss preventives and blood screening tests for your dogs. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test for Babesia Gibsoni is available at Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Gelenggang).

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Ticks are parasites that feed on the blood of host animals, including dogs. It is not uncommon to find ticks on our dogs, especially if they frequent public parks or dog runs. Ticks have the potential to spread diseases. Common tick-borne diseases in dogs include Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, and Babesiosis. These conditions are generally termed tick fever.

Signs of Tick Fever

  • Depending on the type and severity of the tick-borne disease, your dog may suffer from anaemia and/or thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet count). In severe cases, blood transfusion may be required.
  • Other symptoms include fever, lethargy, appetite loss, weight loss, diarrhoea, lameness, and nose bleed.
  • A small percentage of dogs develop ocular symptoms (e.g., conjunctivitis, uveitis, subconjunctival or retinal haemorrhage).
A Siberian Husky appears concerned while lying on the floor of a veterinary clinic with a water bowl and leash in the background.

How Can I Prevent Ticks on My Dog?

  • Perform a daily 'tick check', especially after an outing. Run your fingers through your dog’s fur to feel for small bumps. Check between toes and in the ear flaps.
  • Check your dogs before and after going to public places like dog runs, boarding, and grooming centres. We want to protect our dogs from ticks and also not to spread them.
  • Speak with your vet about shampoo, spot-ons, and oral preventives suitable for your dog.
Close-up view of a tick infestation on a dog's skin, highlighting the importance of parasite prevention and treatment.

I Found Ticks on My Dog. What Should I Do?

  • Remove ticks promptly to reduce the risk of disease transmission. Speak with your vet about the proper way of removing ticks.
  • Shave your dog’s fur to make tick detection easier.
  • Start tick prevention.
  • Consult your vet if your dog shows signs of infection.
  • Replace your dog’s used bedding.
  • Vacuum and wash linen regularly.
  • Engage a professional exterminator if your house is tick-infested.

Screening and Early Detection

As part of your dog’s health screen, we recommend a quick in-house blood test called SNAP 4Dx to detect tick-borne diseases. Treatment may include antibiotics and supportive medications depending on the type and severity of the tick-borne disease, as well as blood transfusion for dogs experiencing severe anaemia or bleeding disorders.

Schedule an appointment with our vets to discuss preventives and blood screening tests for your dogs. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test for Babesia Gibsoni is available at Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Gelenggang).

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
Ticks are parasites that feed on the blood of host animals, including dogs. It is not uncommon to find ticks on our dogs, especially if they frequent public parks or dog runs. Ticks have the potential to spread diseases. Common tick-borne diseases in dogs include Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, and Babesiosis. These conditions are generally termed tick fever.

Signs of Tick Fever

  • Depending on the type and severity of the tick-borne disease, your dog may suffer from anaemia and/or thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet count). In severe cases, blood transfusion may be required.
  • Other symptoms include fever, lethargy, appetite loss, weight loss, diarrhoea, lameness, and nose bleed.
  • A small percentage of dogs develop ocular symptoms (e.g., conjunctivitis, uveitis, subconjunctival or retinal haemorrhage).
A Siberian Husky appears concerned while lying on the floor of a veterinary clinic with a water bowl and leash in the background.

How Can I Prevent Ticks on My Dog?

  • Perform a daily 'tick check', especially after an outing. Run your fingers through your dog’s fur to feel for small bumps. Check between toes and in the ear flaps.
  • Check your dogs before and after going to public places like dog runs, boarding, and grooming centres. We want to protect our dogs from ticks and also not to spread them.
  • Speak with your vet about shampoo, spot-ons, and oral preventives suitable for your dog.
Close-up view of a tick infestation on a dog's skin, highlighting the importance of parasite prevention and treatment.

I Found Ticks on My Dog. What Should I Do?

  • Remove ticks promptly to reduce the risk of disease transmission. Speak with your vet about the proper way of removing ticks.
  • Shave your dog’s fur to make tick detection easier.
  • Start tick prevention.
  • Consult your vet if your dog shows signs of infection.
  • Replace your dog’s used bedding.
  • Vacuum and wash linen regularly.
  • Engage a professional exterminator if your house is tick-infested.

Screening and Early Detection

As part of your dog’s health screen, we recommend a quick in-house blood test called SNAP 4Dx to detect tick-borne diseases. Treatment may include antibiotics and supportive medications depending on the type and severity of the tick-borne disease, as well as blood transfusion for dogs experiencing severe anaemia or bleeding disorders.

Schedule an appointment with our vets to discuss preventives and blood screening tests for your dogs. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test for Babesia Gibsoni is available at Mount Pleasant Vet Centre (Gelenggang).

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
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Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
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