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How to Set Up Your Home for a New Dog

How to Set Up Your Home for a New Dog
Dogs
,
General Care
Share this article
How to Set Up Your Home for a New Dog
How to Set Up Your Home for a New Dog
Dogs
,
General Care
How to Set Up Your Home for a New Dog
Share this article
How to Set Up Your Home for a New Dog
Introducing a new dog to your home needs planning and the right equipment to set yourself up for success. Here is our list of essential items when bringing home a new dog for the first time:

  • Lead and collar or harness
    • Quick-release nylon collars or harnesses are an excellent choice as they are durable, wash well, and have added security in the event your dog becomes stuck.
  • ID tag with name and contact details
  • Bed and bedding
    • The bed should be big enough for your dog to stretch out completely and still be supported. The material should be thick enough to not fully compress under the weight of your dog.
  • Crate
    • The crate needs to be big enough for your dog to stand up, sit up straight, and turn around. If the crate is too big then your dog can hurt themselves by pacing or trying to escape from the cage.
    • Puppies may need multiple cage sizes as they grow.
  • Separate food and water bowls
    • Bowls that are mounted onto stands can reduce spillage and mess.
  • Grooming brushes and nail cutters
  • First aid kit
    • Ask your veterinarian or buy a pre-made one so you have everything on hand in an emergency.
  • At least 3-5 different toys
    • Buy a variety such as a tug rope, chew toy, puzzle toy, and comfort toy.
    • Test the toy before giving it to your dog, to make sure it is not easily breakable or has any parts that can be eaten accidentally.
  • Poop bags and cleaning supplies.
    • Puppies often have accidents indoors, so using incontinence sheets can help reduce staining and contamination of your floors.
  • Training treats
    • A small amount of bribery never hurts! Having a few treats to help your new family member get used to their new home can ease their transition into your family.

Puppy-proofing

Puppies learn about their surroundings by exploring with their mouths. This means we must be extra vigilant to keep them safe from harm. Add child safety locks to your cupboards, bin, and toilet seat, and use baby gates to stop access to areas such as the kitchen or stairs.

Low furniture such as coffee tables is likely to be jumped up on so clear off all items initially until you establish rules and boundaries through training.

Check the type of plants that you keep around the home. Some such as the sago palm can be toxic to dogs if eaten.

Electrical cords can be chewed resulting in electrocution, so tidy all loose cords up out of reach of pets. You should also keep the floor clean of clutter and invest in a shoe rack to keep your shoes safe from little teeth.

Using a crate

All dogs need a safe space to call their own. New dogs and puppies benefit hugely from crate training, and it helps reduce damage to your home when house training. Add some pheromone diffuser such as Adaptil to the bedding or add a few small treats to their bedding to help your dog settle into their crate.

Other pets

Introductions to other pets should be slow. Start by having the pets in different rooms so they can smell and hear each other and keep first introductions short. Try and play with your puppy beforehand to use up lots of energy so they are calmer for the introductions.

Make sure each pet has their own safe space to retreat to (usually their bed) and look up animal body language signs so you can see if they are uncomfortable with the interaction. If you see any signs of aggression, separate the pets into different rooms and contact a professional for help.

Children

Children bring lots of energy, so talking to your children about slow, soft movements around new pets is a good place to start. Use child-friendly posters to educate them about body language in pets, so they can tell when your puppy is feeling uncomfortable. Teaching young children the phrase ‘kind hands’ to use around puppies can help reduce rough handling which may frighten or injure your puppy.

Never leave your children unsupervised with a young puppy. They are not responsible for caring for a puppy's needs, and there is a risk of injury for both children and your puppy. Do not allow young children to clean up toilet accidents, as some parasites can be transmitted from dogs to young children, such as worms.

Encourage your older children to play with your puppy, they will both love this quality bonding time together.

Summary

Bringing home a puppy can be an exciting and stressful time. Make sure you’re prepared by gathering the essential items needed before the puppy comes. Following these tips and guidelines will ensure a successful transition and start to your new life together!

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Introducing a new dog to your home needs planning and the right equipment to set yourself up for success. Here is our list of essential items when bringing home a new dog for the first time:

  • Lead and collar or harness
    • Quick-release nylon collars or harnesses are an excellent choice as they are durable, wash well, and have added security in the event your dog becomes stuck.
  • ID tag with name and contact details
  • Bed and bedding
    • The bed should be big enough for your dog to stretch out completely and still be supported. The material should be thick enough to not fully compress under the weight of your dog.
  • Crate
    • The crate needs to be big enough for your dog to stand up, sit up straight, and turn around. If the crate is too big then your dog can hurt themselves by pacing or trying to escape from the cage.
    • Puppies may need multiple cage sizes as they grow.
  • Separate food and water bowls
    • Bowls that are mounted onto stands can reduce spillage and mess.
  • Grooming brushes and nail cutters
  • First aid kit
    • Ask your veterinarian or buy a pre-made one so you have everything on hand in an emergency.
  • At least 3-5 different toys
    • Buy a variety such as a tug rope, chew toy, puzzle toy, and comfort toy.
    • Test the toy before giving it to your dog, to make sure it is not easily breakable or has any parts that can be eaten accidentally.
  • Poop bags and cleaning supplies.
    • Puppies often have accidents indoors, so using incontinence sheets can help reduce staining and contamination of your floors.
  • Training treats
    • A small amount of bribery never hurts! Having a few treats to help your new family member get used to their new home can ease their transition into your family.

Puppy-proofing

Puppies learn about their surroundings by exploring with their mouths. This means we must be extra vigilant to keep them safe from harm. Add child safety locks to your cupboards, bin, and toilet seat, and use baby gates to stop access to areas such as the kitchen or stairs.

Low furniture such as coffee tables is likely to be jumped up on so clear off all items initially until you establish rules and boundaries through training.

Check the type of plants that you keep around the home. Some such as the sago palm can be toxic to dogs if eaten.

Electrical cords can be chewed resulting in electrocution, so tidy all loose cords up out of reach of pets. You should also keep the floor clean of clutter and invest in a shoe rack to keep your shoes safe from little teeth.

Using a crate

All dogs need a safe space to call their own. New dogs and puppies benefit hugely from crate training, and it helps reduce damage to your home when house training. Add some pheromone diffuser such as Adaptil to the bedding or add a few small treats to their bedding to help your dog settle into their crate.

Other pets

Introductions to other pets should be slow. Start by having the pets in different rooms so they can smell and hear each other and keep first introductions short. Try and play with your puppy beforehand to use up lots of energy so they are calmer for the introductions.

Make sure each pet has their own safe space to retreat to (usually their bed) and look up animal body language signs so you can see if they are uncomfortable with the interaction. If you see any signs of aggression, separate the pets into different rooms and contact a professional for help.

Children

Children bring lots of energy, so talking to your children about slow, soft movements around new pets is a good place to start. Use child-friendly posters to educate them about body language in pets, so they can tell when your puppy is feeling uncomfortable. Teaching young children the phrase ‘kind hands’ to use around puppies can help reduce rough handling which may frighten or injure your puppy.

Never leave your children unsupervised with a young puppy. They are not responsible for caring for a puppy's needs, and there is a risk of injury for both children and your puppy. Do not allow young children to clean up toilet accidents, as some parasites can be transmitted from dogs to young children, such as worms.

Encourage your older children to play with your puppy, they will both love this quality bonding time together.

Summary

Bringing home a puppy can be an exciting and stressful time. Make sure you’re prepared by gathering the essential items needed before the puppy comes. Following these tips and guidelines will ensure a successful transition and start to your new life together!

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
Introducing a new dog to your home needs planning and the right equipment to set yourself up for success. Here is our list of essential items when bringing home a new dog for the first time:

  • Lead and collar or harness
    • Quick-release nylon collars or harnesses are an excellent choice as they are durable, wash well, and have added security in the event your dog becomes stuck.
  • ID tag with name and contact details
  • Bed and bedding
    • The bed should be big enough for your dog to stretch out completely and still be supported. The material should be thick enough to not fully compress under the weight of your dog.
  • Crate
    • The crate needs to be big enough for your dog to stand up, sit up straight, and turn around. If the crate is too big then your dog can hurt themselves by pacing or trying to escape from the cage.
    • Puppies may need multiple cage sizes as they grow.
  • Separate food and water bowls
    • Bowls that are mounted onto stands can reduce spillage and mess.
  • Grooming brushes and nail cutters
  • First aid kit
    • Ask your veterinarian or buy a pre-made one so you have everything on hand in an emergency.
  • At least 3-5 different toys
    • Buy a variety such as a tug rope, chew toy, puzzle toy, and comfort toy.
    • Test the toy before giving it to your dog, to make sure it is not easily breakable or has any parts that can be eaten accidentally.
  • Poop bags and cleaning supplies.
    • Puppies often have accidents indoors, so using incontinence sheets can help reduce staining and contamination of your floors.
  • Training treats
    • A small amount of bribery never hurts! Having a few treats to help your new family member get used to their new home can ease their transition into your family.

Puppy-proofing

Puppies learn about their surroundings by exploring with their mouths. This means we must be extra vigilant to keep them safe from harm. Add child safety locks to your cupboards, bin, and toilet seat, and use baby gates to stop access to areas such as the kitchen or stairs.

Low furniture such as coffee tables is likely to be jumped up on so clear off all items initially until you establish rules and boundaries through training.

Check the type of plants that you keep around the home. Some such as the sago palm can be toxic to dogs if eaten.

Electrical cords can be chewed resulting in electrocution, so tidy all loose cords up out of reach of pets. You should also keep the floor clean of clutter and invest in a shoe rack to keep your shoes safe from little teeth.

Using a crate

All dogs need a safe space to call their own. New dogs and puppies benefit hugely from crate training, and it helps reduce damage to your home when house training. Add some pheromone diffuser such as Adaptil to the bedding or add a few small treats to their bedding to help your dog settle into their crate.

Other pets

Introductions to other pets should be slow. Start by having the pets in different rooms so they can smell and hear each other and keep first introductions short. Try and play with your puppy beforehand to use up lots of energy so they are calmer for the introductions.

Make sure each pet has their own safe space to retreat to (usually their bed) and look up animal body language signs so you can see if they are uncomfortable with the interaction. If you see any signs of aggression, separate the pets into different rooms and contact a professional for help.

Children

Children bring lots of energy, so talking to your children about slow, soft movements around new pets is a good place to start. Use child-friendly posters to educate them about body language in pets, so they can tell when your puppy is feeling uncomfortable. Teaching young children the phrase ‘kind hands’ to use around puppies can help reduce rough handling which may frighten or injure your puppy.

Never leave your children unsupervised with a young puppy. They are not responsible for caring for a puppy's needs, and there is a risk of injury for both children and your puppy. Do not allow young children to clean up toilet accidents, as some parasites can be transmitted from dogs to young children, such as worms.

Encourage your older children to play with your puppy, they will both love this quality bonding time together.

Summary

Bringing home a puppy can be an exciting and stressful time. Make sure you’re prepared by gathering the essential items needed before the puppy comes. Following these tips and guidelines will ensure a successful transition and start to your new life together!

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
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