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Exercise: The Key to a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle

Exercise: The Key to a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle
Dogs
,
General Care
Share this article
Exercise: The Key to a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle
Exercise: The Key to a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle
Dogs
,
General Care
Exercise: The Key to a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle
Share this article
Exercise: The Key to a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle
Exercising your dog is an important way to keep them in peak health. Just like people, the benefits of exercise in dogs are well documented. Exercise helps keep our pets in a normal weight range which is important to prevent your dog from becoming overweight. Physical health benefits include avoiding complications of obesity such as joint disease, high blood pressure, and respiratory disease. Regular exercise also helps keep muscles toned and limbs supple. Exercise is responsible for the release of happy hormones called endorphins, which act as a natural mood booster in pets.

How much exercise should a dog get?

The exact amount of exercise a dog needs depends on their age, breed, and fitness levels. At a minimum try to give your dog at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. If you don’t exercise your dog enough, they may become bored and restless. This can lead to destructive behaviours such as barking, scratching at doors or windows, or chewing items in the home such as carpet and shoes. These behavioural issues can be hard to stop once started.

The good news is that exercise comes in many different forms. From chasing bubbles around the living room, practising a range of obedience commands, swimming or going on a hike with the family - exercise can be varied and fun.

Exercise by age

Age is important when considering your dog’s exercise needs. Puppies need exercise but talk to your vet about the type of activity that’s best for them. Some puppies can damage their joints if they are exercised too intensively whilst still growing. Puppies enjoy training and bonding time so add in lots of short training sessions or games throughout the day as well as daily walks to meet their needs.

If your dog is in the prime of their life (two to seven) they will be able to enjoy lots of physical activity each day, especially if they have good fitness levels.

A senior dog (8+) often enjoys a slower pace of life, but still enjoys getting out and about. Try lots of slow walks with pauses to sniff the grass and watch the world go by. Senior dogs can benefit hugely from brain games and puzzles to keep their brains active and ward off any signs of senility.

Exercise for different breeds

Breed is another factor that will guide your dog's exercise needs. Some dogs, such as the easy going chihuahua, are completely content with a half an hour walk per day. More lively breeds, like the Jack Russell Terrier or the Labrador Retriever, will need a minimum of one to two hours of exercise daily to be content.

Some breeds have exercise limitations - short-nosed breeds can really struggle with some types of exercise. If you have a brachycephalic breed such as a Shih Tzu, try to take them on walks during cooler parts of the day to avoid risks of heat stroke.

Mental exercise

Did you know that dogs need mental exercise just as much as they need physical? Dogs are far more intelligent than we give them credit for and it's important to allow them to use their brains. The added benefit is that mental exercise can be very tiring for dogs (especially puppies!) so they often have a good nap after a tough puzzle.

Mental stimulation can come from a variety of sources. It can be through socialisation with other dogs or a group training class. It can also be a quick training session at home with some quality one-on-one time with you or another family member.

Brain games and puzzles are another good way to keep your dog occupied. Activities such as snuffle mats, puzzle feeders, and Kong toys are just a few examples of types of brain activities to keep your dog entertained.

The best part of mental stimulation is that it doesn’t have to be expensive. Games such as hide and seek or hiding small bits of treats around the home for your dog to sniff out and find are an easy way to have fun with your pup at home.

Summary

A healthy dog needs physical and mental activity to live a good life. There are many ways for us as pet parents to meet that need, so finding things that you both enjoy is key to a more active lifestyle.

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Exercising your dog is an important way to keep them in peak health. Just like people, the benefits of exercise in dogs are well documented. Exercise helps keep our pets in a normal weight range which is important to prevent your dog from becoming overweight. Physical health benefits include avoiding complications of obesity such as joint disease, high blood pressure, and respiratory disease. Regular exercise also helps keep muscles toned and limbs supple. Exercise is responsible for the release of happy hormones called endorphins, which act as a natural mood booster in pets.

How much exercise should a dog get?

The exact amount of exercise a dog needs depends on their age, breed, and fitness levels. At a minimum try to give your dog at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. If you don’t exercise your dog enough, they may become bored and restless. This can lead to destructive behaviours such as barking, scratching at doors or windows, or chewing items in the home such as carpet and shoes. These behavioural issues can be hard to stop once started.

The good news is that exercise comes in many different forms. From chasing bubbles around the living room, practising a range of obedience commands, swimming or going on a hike with the family - exercise can be varied and fun.

Exercise by age

Age is important when considering your dog’s exercise needs. Puppies need exercise but talk to your vet about the type of activity that’s best for them. Some puppies can damage their joints if they are exercised too intensively whilst still growing. Puppies enjoy training and bonding time so add in lots of short training sessions or games throughout the day as well as daily walks to meet their needs.

If your dog is in the prime of their life (two to seven) they will be able to enjoy lots of physical activity each day, especially if they have good fitness levels.

A senior dog (8+) often enjoys a slower pace of life, but still enjoys getting out and about. Try lots of slow walks with pauses to sniff the grass and watch the world go by. Senior dogs can benefit hugely from brain games and puzzles to keep their brains active and ward off any signs of senility.

Exercise for different breeds

Breed is another factor that will guide your dog's exercise needs. Some dogs, such as the easy going chihuahua, are completely content with a half an hour walk per day. More lively breeds, like the Jack Russell Terrier or the Labrador Retriever, will need a minimum of one to two hours of exercise daily to be content.

Some breeds have exercise limitations - short-nosed breeds can really struggle with some types of exercise. If you have a brachycephalic breed such as a Shih Tzu, try to take them on walks during cooler parts of the day to avoid risks of heat stroke.

Mental exercise

Did you know that dogs need mental exercise just as much as they need physical? Dogs are far more intelligent than we give them credit for and it's important to allow them to use their brains. The added benefit is that mental exercise can be very tiring for dogs (especially puppies!) so they often have a good nap after a tough puzzle.

Mental stimulation can come from a variety of sources. It can be through socialisation with other dogs or a group training class. It can also be a quick training session at home with some quality one-on-one time with you or another family member.

Brain games and puzzles are another good way to keep your dog occupied. Activities such as snuffle mats, puzzle feeders, and Kong toys are just a few examples of types of brain activities to keep your dog entertained.

The best part of mental stimulation is that it doesn’t have to be expensive. Games such as hide and seek or hiding small bits of treats around the home for your dog to sniff out and find are an easy way to have fun with your pup at home.

Summary

A healthy dog needs physical and mental activity to live a good life. There are many ways for us as pet parents to meet that need, so finding things that you both enjoy is key to a more active lifestyle.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
Exercising your dog is an important way to keep them in peak health. Just like people, the benefits of exercise in dogs are well documented. Exercise helps keep our pets in a normal weight range which is important to prevent your dog from becoming overweight. Physical health benefits include avoiding complications of obesity such as joint disease, high blood pressure, and respiratory disease. Regular exercise also helps keep muscles toned and limbs supple. Exercise is responsible for the release of happy hormones called endorphins, which act as a natural mood booster in pets.

How much exercise should a dog get?

The exact amount of exercise a dog needs depends on their age, breed, and fitness levels. At a minimum try to give your dog at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. If you don’t exercise your dog enough, they may become bored and restless. This can lead to destructive behaviours such as barking, scratching at doors or windows, or chewing items in the home such as carpet and shoes. These behavioural issues can be hard to stop once started.

The good news is that exercise comes in many different forms. From chasing bubbles around the living room, practising a range of obedience commands, swimming or going on a hike with the family - exercise can be varied and fun.

Exercise by age

Age is important when considering your dog’s exercise needs. Puppies need exercise but talk to your vet about the type of activity that’s best for them. Some puppies can damage their joints if they are exercised too intensively whilst still growing. Puppies enjoy training and bonding time so add in lots of short training sessions or games throughout the day as well as daily walks to meet their needs.

If your dog is in the prime of their life (two to seven) they will be able to enjoy lots of physical activity each day, especially if they have good fitness levels.

A senior dog (8+) often enjoys a slower pace of life, but still enjoys getting out and about. Try lots of slow walks with pauses to sniff the grass and watch the world go by. Senior dogs can benefit hugely from brain games and puzzles to keep their brains active and ward off any signs of senility.

Exercise for different breeds

Breed is another factor that will guide your dog's exercise needs. Some dogs, such as the easy going chihuahua, are completely content with a half an hour walk per day. More lively breeds, like the Jack Russell Terrier or the Labrador Retriever, will need a minimum of one to two hours of exercise daily to be content.

Some breeds have exercise limitations - short-nosed breeds can really struggle with some types of exercise. If you have a brachycephalic breed such as a Shih Tzu, try to take them on walks during cooler parts of the day to avoid risks of heat stroke.

Mental exercise

Did you know that dogs need mental exercise just as much as they need physical? Dogs are far more intelligent than we give them credit for and it's important to allow them to use their brains. The added benefit is that mental exercise can be very tiring for dogs (especially puppies!) so they often have a good nap after a tough puzzle.

Mental stimulation can come from a variety of sources. It can be through socialisation with other dogs or a group training class. It can also be a quick training session at home with some quality one-on-one time with you or another family member.

Brain games and puzzles are another good way to keep your dog occupied. Activities such as snuffle mats, puzzle feeders, and Kong toys are just a few examples of types of brain activities to keep your dog entertained.

The best part of mental stimulation is that it doesn’t have to be expensive. Games such as hide and seek or hiding small bits of treats around the home for your dog to sniff out and find are an easy way to have fun with your pup at home.

Summary

A healthy dog needs physical and mental activity to live a good life. There are many ways for us as pet parents to meet that need, so finding things that you both enjoy is key to a more active lifestyle.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
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