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Diet and Nutrition – All You Need to Know About Cat Food

Diet and Nutrition – All You Need to Know About Cat Food
Cats
,
Nutrition
Share this article
Diet and Nutrition – All You Need to Know About Cat Food
Diet and Nutrition – All You Need to Know About Cat Food
Cats
,
Nutrition
Diet and Nutrition – All You Need to Know About Cat Food
Share this article
Diet and Nutrition – All You Need to Know About Cat Food
Our cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they require a meat-based diet to ensure the proper function of their digestive system and other body systems. Therefore, a balanced diet is vital to ensure our cats are as happy and healthy as possible.

Importance of a Good Diet

A balanced feline diet should contain adequate amounts of the following nutrients:

  • Protein
  • Fats
  • Carbohydrates
  • Vitamins and minerals

It is essential to check that the commercial food you feed your cat is approved and marked as a complete diet. A complete diet means it contains all of the daily nutrients your cat requires. This diet can then help prevent our cats from developing conditions such as diabetes and thiamine deficiency disease. Commercial pet food labels must provide information on the nutritional profile of the food. They will also usually provide information on which life stage the food is intended for (most commonly kitten/junior/adult/senior).

Feeding your cat the correct type of food as well as the correct amount is one of the most important parts of their preventative health care regime. Your veterinarian can help advise on the most appropriate food for your cat and their individual needs. As part of your cat’s annual health examination and vaccinations, your veterinarian will weigh your cat. It is recommended to make a note of their weight at the time of the appointment, which will then allow you to feed your cat according to the guidelines detailed on your cat food. Purchasing a pet scale for at-home use can be a great way to monitor any more subtle weight changes monthly. Your veterinarian can also advise on your cat’s body condition score, which will help with choosing the correct amount of food to feed your cat to ensure they are meeting their daily calorific requirements.

As discussed previously, a good feline diet contains all the nutrients your cat needs for normal body functions. However, there is more to our cat’s diets than just the nutrient profile. Cats are notoriously fussy eaters, so their food must be palatable to them. Kibble size for dry food is an important factor in palatability, as is the flavour and texture of the food. Different cats will have different flavour preferences, so it may take some trial and error to find one that your cat most enjoys. Feeding a mixture of wet (canned/pouches) and dry food (kibble) is generally recommended. Dry food can help with dental health, while wet food can help increase water intake for our cats. Ensure that fresh water is readily available to your cat at all times. It is also important to note that many cats will not eat or drink if their food and water dishes are located too close together, so it is recommended to keep them on different sides of the room to promote good drinking and eating habits.

Diets for Different Life Stages

As your cat grows from a kitten to an adult and into their senior years, they will have slightly different dietary requirements. Because of this, it is essential to select a cat food that is tailored to your cat’s life stage. Young kittens have high protein requirements to support their growth, as well as the development of their brains and nervous system. Kittens and young cats are also generally more active and playful and will have a higher energy requirement than many older cats, who are often more sedentary.

Your veterinarian will be able to advise whether your cat has any specific dietary requirements throughout their life. This is particularly important if your cat has been diagnosed with a medical condition such as chronic kidney disease which requires some dietary changes as part of the ongoing management of the disease.

Cat Treats

The type of treats your cat will enjoy will very much depend on your cat’s preference and any dietary and/or medical requirements they may have. Small amounts of cooked chicken breast can be a very tasty treat, as can cooked white fish. It is also possible to use some of your cat’s kibble as a treat. To prevent overfeeding, it is recommended to weigh out your cat’s food in the morning time. Give half of this food as their breakfast and keep the remaining half in a sealed Tupperware container. This second half of the food portion can then be dipped into throughout the day to use for training treats/ rewards as needed. Then, whatever is left in the Tupperware container is your cat’s dinner. This is also a beneficial feeding technique in multi-person households to prevent overfeeding and subsequent risk of obesity!

There are also lots of options for using treats as a source of enrichment for your cat, such as puzzle feeders. This can be particularly important in older cats to help improve their mobility and exercise levels.

There are a variety of supplements available for cats that can complement their diet. However, as always, it is recommended to discuss with your veterinarian before introducing any new foods and/or supplements into your cat's diet.

Obesity

Good nutrition is also important to help manage our cat’s weight. Many cats live very sedentary lifestyles, meaning it is even more important to monitor their food intake to prevent conditions such as obesity. Obesity can put cats at an increased risk of serious health conditions.

Changes in Eating Habits

If you noticed any changes in your cat’s appetite, thirst, weight gain, or weight loss, it is essential to seek prompt veterinary advice as this could be an indication that your cat has a health issue that requires medical intervention.

Summary

The food we feed our pets is incredibly important for their long-term health. Choosing which diet to use for your pets can be a hard decision. Consult with your veterinarian to make sure your cat is getting a nutritious and balanced diet.

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Our cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they require a meat-based diet to ensure the proper function of their digestive system and other body systems. Therefore, a balanced diet is vital to ensure our cats are as happy and healthy as possible.

Importance of a Good Diet

A balanced feline diet should contain adequate amounts of the following nutrients:

  • Protein
  • Fats
  • Carbohydrates
  • Vitamins and minerals

It is essential to check that the commercial food you feed your cat is approved and marked as a complete diet. A complete diet means it contains all of the daily nutrients your cat requires. This diet can then help prevent our cats from developing conditions such as diabetes and thiamine deficiency disease. Commercial pet food labels must provide information on the nutritional profile of the food. They will also usually provide information on which life stage the food is intended for (most commonly kitten/junior/adult/senior).

Feeding your cat the correct type of food as well as the correct amount is one of the most important parts of their preventative health care regime. Your veterinarian can help advise on the most appropriate food for your cat and their individual needs. As part of your cat’s annual health examination and vaccinations, your veterinarian will weigh your cat. It is recommended to make a note of their weight at the time of the appointment, which will then allow you to feed your cat according to the guidelines detailed on your cat food. Purchasing a pet scale for at-home use can be a great way to monitor any more subtle weight changes monthly. Your veterinarian can also advise on your cat’s body condition score, which will help with choosing the correct amount of food to feed your cat to ensure they are meeting their daily calorific requirements.

As discussed previously, a good feline diet contains all the nutrients your cat needs for normal body functions. However, there is more to our cat’s diets than just the nutrient profile. Cats are notoriously fussy eaters, so their food must be palatable to them. Kibble size for dry food is an important factor in palatability, as is the flavour and texture of the food. Different cats will have different flavour preferences, so it may take some trial and error to find one that your cat most enjoys. Feeding a mixture of wet (canned/pouches) and dry food (kibble) is generally recommended. Dry food can help with dental health, while wet food can help increase water intake for our cats. Ensure that fresh water is readily available to your cat at all times. It is also important to note that many cats will not eat or drink if their food and water dishes are located too close together, so it is recommended to keep them on different sides of the room to promote good drinking and eating habits.

Diets for Different Life Stages

As your cat grows from a kitten to an adult and into their senior years, they will have slightly different dietary requirements. Because of this, it is essential to select a cat food that is tailored to your cat’s life stage. Young kittens have high protein requirements to support their growth, as well as the development of their brains and nervous system. Kittens and young cats are also generally more active and playful and will have a higher energy requirement than many older cats, who are often more sedentary.

Your veterinarian will be able to advise whether your cat has any specific dietary requirements throughout their life. This is particularly important if your cat has been diagnosed with a medical condition such as chronic kidney disease which requires some dietary changes as part of the ongoing management of the disease.

Cat Treats

The type of treats your cat will enjoy will very much depend on your cat’s preference and any dietary and/or medical requirements they may have. Small amounts of cooked chicken breast can be a very tasty treat, as can cooked white fish. It is also possible to use some of your cat’s kibble as a treat. To prevent overfeeding, it is recommended to weigh out your cat’s food in the morning time. Give half of this food as their breakfast and keep the remaining half in a sealed Tupperware container. This second half of the food portion can then be dipped into throughout the day to use for training treats/ rewards as needed. Then, whatever is left in the Tupperware container is your cat’s dinner. This is also a beneficial feeding technique in multi-person households to prevent overfeeding and subsequent risk of obesity!

There are also lots of options for using treats as a source of enrichment for your cat, such as puzzle feeders. This can be particularly important in older cats to help improve their mobility and exercise levels.

There are a variety of supplements available for cats that can complement their diet. However, as always, it is recommended to discuss with your veterinarian before introducing any new foods and/or supplements into your cat's diet.

Obesity

Good nutrition is also important to help manage our cat’s weight. Many cats live very sedentary lifestyles, meaning it is even more important to monitor their food intake to prevent conditions such as obesity. Obesity can put cats at an increased risk of serious health conditions.

Changes in Eating Habits

If you noticed any changes in your cat’s appetite, thirst, weight gain, or weight loss, it is essential to seek prompt veterinary advice as this could be an indication that your cat has a health issue that requires medical intervention.

Summary

The food we feed our pets is incredibly important for their long-term health. Choosing which diet to use for your pets can be a hard decision. Consult with your veterinarian to make sure your cat is getting a nutritious and balanced diet.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
Our cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they require a meat-based diet to ensure the proper function of their digestive system and other body systems. Therefore, a balanced diet is vital to ensure our cats are as happy and healthy as possible.

Importance of a Good Diet

A balanced feline diet should contain adequate amounts of the following nutrients:

  • Protein
  • Fats
  • Carbohydrates
  • Vitamins and minerals

It is essential to check that the commercial food you feed your cat is approved and marked as a complete diet. A complete diet means it contains all of the daily nutrients your cat requires. This diet can then help prevent our cats from developing conditions such as diabetes and thiamine deficiency disease. Commercial pet food labels must provide information on the nutritional profile of the food. They will also usually provide information on which life stage the food is intended for (most commonly kitten/junior/adult/senior).

Feeding your cat the correct type of food as well as the correct amount is one of the most important parts of their preventative health care regime. Your veterinarian can help advise on the most appropriate food for your cat and their individual needs. As part of your cat’s annual health examination and vaccinations, your veterinarian will weigh your cat. It is recommended to make a note of their weight at the time of the appointment, which will then allow you to feed your cat according to the guidelines detailed on your cat food. Purchasing a pet scale for at-home use can be a great way to monitor any more subtle weight changes monthly. Your veterinarian can also advise on your cat’s body condition score, which will help with choosing the correct amount of food to feed your cat to ensure they are meeting their daily calorific requirements.

As discussed previously, a good feline diet contains all the nutrients your cat needs for normal body functions. However, there is more to our cat’s diets than just the nutrient profile. Cats are notoriously fussy eaters, so their food must be palatable to them. Kibble size for dry food is an important factor in palatability, as is the flavour and texture of the food. Different cats will have different flavour preferences, so it may take some trial and error to find one that your cat most enjoys. Feeding a mixture of wet (canned/pouches) and dry food (kibble) is generally recommended. Dry food can help with dental health, while wet food can help increase water intake for our cats. Ensure that fresh water is readily available to your cat at all times. It is also important to note that many cats will not eat or drink if their food and water dishes are located too close together, so it is recommended to keep them on different sides of the room to promote good drinking and eating habits.

Diets for Different Life Stages

As your cat grows from a kitten to an adult and into their senior years, they will have slightly different dietary requirements. Because of this, it is essential to select a cat food that is tailored to your cat’s life stage. Young kittens have high protein requirements to support their growth, as well as the development of their brains and nervous system. Kittens and young cats are also generally more active and playful and will have a higher energy requirement than many older cats, who are often more sedentary.

Your veterinarian will be able to advise whether your cat has any specific dietary requirements throughout their life. This is particularly important if your cat has been diagnosed with a medical condition such as chronic kidney disease which requires some dietary changes as part of the ongoing management of the disease.

Cat Treats

The type of treats your cat will enjoy will very much depend on your cat’s preference and any dietary and/or medical requirements they may have. Small amounts of cooked chicken breast can be a very tasty treat, as can cooked white fish. It is also possible to use some of your cat’s kibble as a treat. To prevent overfeeding, it is recommended to weigh out your cat’s food in the morning time. Give half of this food as their breakfast and keep the remaining half in a sealed Tupperware container. This second half of the food portion can then be dipped into throughout the day to use for training treats/ rewards as needed. Then, whatever is left in the Tupperware container is your cat’s dinner. This is also a beneficial feeding technique in multi-person households to prevent overfeeding and subsequent risk of obesity!

There are also lots of options for using treats as a source of enrichment for your cat, such as puzzle feeders. This can be particularly important in older cats to help improve their mobility and exercise levels.

There are a variety of supplements available for cats that can complement their diet. However, as always, it is recommended to discuss with your veterinarian before introducing any new foods and/or supplements into your cat's diet.

Obesity

Good nutrition is also important to help manage our cat’s weight. Many cats live very sedentary lifestyles, meaning it is even more important to monitor their food intake to prevent conditions such as obesity. Obesity can put cats at an increased risk of serious health conditions.

Changes in Eating Habits

If you noticed any changes in your cat’s appetite, thirst, weight gain, or weight loss, it is essential to seek prompt veterinary advice as this could be an indication that your cat has a health issue that requires medical intervention.

Summary

The food we feed our pets is incredibly important for their long-term health. Choosing which diet to use for your pets can be a hard decision. Consult with your veterinarian to make sure your cat is getting a nutritious and balanced diet.

Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Keep Reading
Subscribe
Always be up to date!
Receive a digest of the latest events and offers for you and your pet every month.
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